Saturday, October 24, 2009

Windows 7 Slow boot up with long blank screen

I have a x64 clean install of Windows 7 Home Premium and suffered from a very slow boot time after initial installation.

After seeing the initial Windows Logo there would be some hard drive activity then a long period (40+ seconds) of a blank screen, no disk activity then finally the process continues and the OS loads pretty quickly after that.

A quick Google did not give me any clues and a browse through the Windows event log also proved fruitless.

I have however managed to solve the problem, now it may be one of the 2 things I tried before the next reboot.

First I downloaded and installed the lasted AMD chipset drivers for my motherboard and installed those. I don't however think this was the solution.

The delay seemed to be some sort of time-out, like a network time-out.

I connect my PC (desktop PC) to the internet via Wireless USB, not the Ethernet adapter. I look in the networking control panel showed that the Ethernet adapter was installed and enabled. I disabled it.

Reboot.

No more delay.

Total boot time from to opening a my Firefox homepage 1 min 13 seconds. A vast improvement.

If disabling the Ethernet adapter worked for you, please comment.

edit: seems that the Ethernet is is not the problem, it seemed to work for a while but now I'm faced with a similarly long 30 sec delay. From a a bit of googling it appears this may be an Issue with NVidia drivers alone or a conflict with AMD/ATI motherboard drivers.

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Edit: Update - Finally had some time to have another go at trouble shooting this.

Downloaded and re-installed the latest NVidia x64 drivers (as admin with AV disabled).
Downloaded and installed the latest ASUS drivers for my Mobo.

A usuak Google was to enable boot logging - Type msconfig in the Start Search field | 'Boot' tab | Check 'Boot log', hit OK and reboot. When you arrive at the Desktop, look for the ntbtlog.txt file in the %SystemRoot%\Ntbtlog.txt directory, then check the log for anything related to the slow startup.

After a reboot I had a number of errors in the ntbtlog.txt

Did not load driver \SystemRoot\System32\drivers\vga.sys
Did not load driver \SystemRoot\System32\Drivers\NDProxy.SYS
Did not load driver \SystemRoot\System32\Drivers\NDProxy.SYS
Did not load driver \SystemRoot\System32\Drivers\NDProxy.SYS
Did not load driver \SystemRoot\System32\Drivers\NDProxy.SYS
Loaded driver \??\C:\Program Files (x86)\LogMeIn\x64\RaInfo.sys
Loaded driver \??\C:\Windows\system32\drivers\LMIRfsDriver.sys
Did not load driver \SystemRoot\System32\DRIVERS\srv.sys


A google of the 1st line led me to here... which seems to indicate a very similar problem to mine.

I do 2 network cards. The built in ethernet (disabled in device manager) and my USB Wireless dongle.

Run the sfc /scannow as admin. 100% completed detected no problems!?

Now looking at the boot log file again I see 2 entries...

Loaded driver \SystemRoot\System32\drivers\vga.sys

then later on

Did not load driver \SystemRoot\System32\drivers\vga.sys


So it looks like it's trying to load it twice and failing?

Same thing for

Loaded driver \SystemRoot\System32\Drivers\NDProxy.SYS
Did not load driver \SystemRoot\System32\Drivers\NDProxy.SYS
Did not load driver \SystemRoot\System32\Drivers\NDProxy.SYS
Did not load driver \SystemRoot\System32\Drivers\NDProxy.SYS
Did not load driver \SystemRoot\System32\Drivers\NDProxy.SYS


using msconfig I disabled the wired autoconfig service but it broke the wireless networking (go figure).

I got a good fast boot to desktop in undera minute. No deplay at all at ~22 seconds I get a mouse pointer and it all goes very fast from there. Unfortunately it breaks the wireless network and I get no wireless connection.

re-enabling the service failed to get the wireless network working against without having to un-install and re-install the wireless network device driver and reboot thereafter went back to the slow boot on 2+ mins.

My guess so far is that it's trying to find some network or internet connection, the wireless connection does not authenticate until after the user login since the authentication is user specific and requires the encryption key.

oddly disabling the wlan autoconfig service at boot does not affect the boot time but does affect the wireless connectivity.

I downloaded and installed the latest windows 7 drivers for the Ethernet card and re-enabled it. I then re-enabled the wired auto config.

I tried to set the WLan autoconfig service on a delayed start up but was prevented from doing so.

A reboot and I was at desktop in 30 seconds, but the wireless adapter although shown to be working properly in device manager was not seeing any networks and not connecting. it looks like the Ethernet driver install also did something to the USB device driver auto detect since the mouse no longer worked for a good min or 2 and my external USB attached HDD decided to give me the auto-run device plug-in screen. Weird!

A restart of the WLan Autoconfig service got it working again.

Another reboot and the same problem, a quick boot to desktop and then 2 mins of looking at waiting for all the services to enable. No wireless networking again...

Next I un installed and re-installed the Wireless adapter and rebooted. Back to the 2 min black screen but wireless auot connected without a problem.

So at least I now know it's the wireless causing the problem.




25 comments:

Kent said...

same problem here with w 7 upgrade from vista 64 on a new hp pavilion. 1 hour with microsoft help didn't help -- they gave up. problem seems to have abated -- given patience with boot-up.

Kent said...

disconnected my ethernet connection -- no difference in boot up time -- 14 mins.

LostBenji said...

Found this website and thread, very helpful but issue was a USB device hanging it up. The bloody printer has a card reader in it and seen as a mass storage device that was flagged. Turned printer off and rebooted, fine and back to speed.

Ronny said...

My story sounds like Insane Homers with ndproxy, wlan and stuff. Thats how i found this blog.

I suspected the WLAN component too and tried a lot of things.

My solution at least was easy. I had just to remove the network connections, that can not be connected at startup.

Anonymous said...

For me I had an old Vista HP printer driver for an HP PSC 2510 all in one device from before I upgraded to Windows 7. The extensive software package had many elements. A service called "hpqcxs08" caused the problem. I uninstalled the entire software and I got normal boot times.

ilan said...

i found the answer in my computer:



MB MSI P35 combo
on the bios
in the Advanced Bios Features
Chipset Feature
turn HPET to enable

NALIZO

YodaDaToka said...

I was having the same issues but thankfully LostBenji's comment got me thinking about the 8GB SD card I had in my laptops card reader - i'd only put it there recently. It's one of these SD adapters with a MicroSD inside and sometimes it has trouble recognising once it's inserted.

Removed; rebooted now I'm back to about 10s from start of black screen to logon prompt.

It sometimes pays to try out the simple things first.

Insane Homer said...

I've downloaded and install the Windows 7 SP1 Beta and it's still exhibiting the same problem.

Anonymous said...

I had a similar problem and couldn't figure out what it was even after going through the boot log. Eventually resorted to MSCONFIG and disabling all the services there. Then gradually starting them in chunks (made it easy on me and did them in alphabetical order) and rebooting. It turned out to be the power manager software.

PatrickH said...

Had this blank screen on my 2 W7 PCs or a while.
Installing system on SSD disks did not help as they were no hard disk activity.

I finally found this cause : networked disks that are not available at boot time ! The unable to connect network drive message tipped me.

After unmounting those drive, I had 3 consecutive fast normal boot. Now SSD really rocks !

Hope this help anyone.

Kathryn said...

Wait PAtrickH what did you do? Can you explain that? I'm having the same problem! My laptop gives me a black screen (HP pavilion with windows 7 32 bit i think) and it stays like that for 1 minute. I tried doing a full system restore which stopped it from not starting up at all, but now it's really slow, and freezes when I use firefox and have to restart. I always get worried that it won't start up when i restart it because it's so delayed. And it's not even half a year old!

Kathryn said...

PatrickH can you explain exactly what you did? I have an HP pavilion with windows 7 32 bit i believe, and it gives me a black screen after the microsoft symbol for at least a minute, then it takes forever for my computer to load after that. Also, it freezes when I use firefox and I don't know what to do. I think it might be related to the internet drivers...but if it is, that doesn't explain why windows is slow to load. Please help! My laptop isn't even half a year old!

Fred said...

Hey, I'm also having this issue. I bought an HP laptop a few months ago. It ran very smooth for about a month then I started having this same issue.

The problem only occurs when you log in as administrator. If you use a regular user account you won't have the delay.

Someone said the problem is networked disks, perhaps yes, I have a wireless Epson printer that has a card reader and if the printer is not on I get the message 'could not reconnect all network drives', but again, this only happens if I log in with the administrator account.

I have determined the service that causes the delay is WLAN Autoconfig.

As a quick work around, my laptop has a key to quickly turn on/off the wireless adapter. So when I need to log in with the administrator account, I simply press the key to turn it off before I log in, a couple of seconds later after entering the password and hitting enter I just press the key again to enable the wireless adapter.

Anonymous said...

It turns out that the problem is and still is the motherboard of my laptop. At least that's what the HP technician said then he tried not to because then they'd have to give me a new computer

Lee said...

I stumbled across this blog entry while googling the same problem-- I managed to fix it using msconfig.

Launch msconfig and select Diagnostic startup and reboot- If this eliminates the delay it tells us that a startup program or service is causing it.

At this point it's a process of elimination. I re-enabled all the startup programs (those under the "startup" tab) and rebooted- no hang-up.

Next I went into the services tab and sorted them by name. Then I disabled the top half of all the services, rebooted, no hang-up. You can see where I'm going with this... You make a note of what you disable and reboot until the hang-up occurs.

For me it turned out to be some kind of 3rd party Power Management utility. Once disabled the delay stopped occuring. Hopefully this helps someone out.

Anonymous said...

Just a small details that might be worth checking. In a case at my work, the issue seemed to be with the bluetooth connection. So if your wireless card has a dual functionality like this one, deactivating during the troubleshooting may provide an interesting insight.

Anonymous said...

For me it was a 3rd party Power Management tool too...
Thanks!!

ez12a said...

My particular delay was resolved with disabling the bluetooth adapter on my motherboard along with unmounting several mapped drives (6) that were offline. My guess is Windows tries to connect to these at start up causing the delay.

Anonymous said...

I had this problem and I resolved it, I hope it help you guys
first i went to motherboard setup ( for most motherboards press delet button when booting up), then went to boot tab and disabled first and second priority for boot, after I was restarting the computer, period of black screen decreased from 40 sec to zero!!!

Fabian said...

PatrickH said...
Had this blank screen on my 2 W7 PCs or a while.
Installing system on SSD disks did not help as they were no hard disk activity.

I finally found this cause : networked disks that are not available at boot time ! The unable to connect network drive message tipped me.

After unmounting those drive, I had 3 consecutive fast normal boot. Now SSD really rocks !

Hope this help anyone.

December 25, 2010 11:13 AM

This worked for me. I had 5 network disks mapped to my old NAS. Unmounted those and boot went from 90 seconds to just over 30 seconds and no blank screen. My HD is a Momentus XT Hybrid. Thanks for that PatrickH

Fabian said...

PatrickH said...
Had this blank screen on my 2 W7 PCs or a while.
Installing system on SSD disks did not help as they were no hard disk activity.

I finally found this cause : networked disks that are not available at boot time ! The unable to connect network drive message tipped me.

After unmounting those drive, I had 3 consecutive fast normal boot. Now SSD really rocks !

Hope this help anyone.

December 25, 2010 11:13 AM

This worked for me. I had 5 network disks mapped to my old NAS. Unmounted those and boot went from 90 seconds to just over 30 seconds and no blank screen. My HD is a Momentus XT Hybrid. Thanks for that PatrickH

french_it_independant said...

Hello,

I used deactivate all services with msconfig, then a script of minimal services thanks to black viper's page and it worked quite correctly again (from 4min30s to 1min30s again to ie page, vista 32, notebook).

More info there
http://www.blackviper.com/sitemap/

Anonymous said...

Thanks Homer, have had this problem for a while and tried a number of things to no avail. As soon as I disabled the ethernet adapter, it was ok and no more 2 minute black screen!

Anonymous said...

Thank you for this blog entry and to all the commenters. I have had this problem for months with my HP Pavilion Elite e9220y and after reading the comments, I disabled my ethernet service on startup using msconfig, and it worked like a charm. I was all ready to wipe my hdd and do a clean install of Win7 again, but this saved me the hours it would have taken to rebuild my system!

David said...

Thanks everyone! The blog post and the comments were extremely helpful. I am pretty tech savvy (I work at a virtualization data center), but I couldn't figure this out. Turns out it was a network drive to my media server (which is not always on). I am going to end up making a script to mount the network drive when I need the drive.